Magnesium, Knee Pain, Restless Leg Syndrome

[title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Question[/title][testimonials design=”classic” backgroundcolor=”” textcolor=”” class=”” id=””][testimonial name=”” avatar=”male” image=”” image_border_radius=”” company=”” link=”” target=”_self”]What are some remedies for foot and toe cramps?[/testimonial][/testimonials][separator style_type=”none” top_margin=”” bottom_margin=”20″ sep_color=”” icon=”” width=”” class=”” id=””][title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Answer[/title][testimonials design=”classic” backgroundcolor=”” textcolor=”” class=”” id=””][testimonial name=”” avatar=”male” image=”” image_border_radius=”” company=”” link=”” target=”_self”]What’s going on here, is that you have one of two things, or both of these two things going on. A tendinitis behind the knee will cause a pair of muscles that attach at the posterior tibial plateau to spasm, and pull your toes downward. So throwing a towel down there and pulling the toes back will give you symptomatic relief, but it doesn’t fix the tendinitis behind the knee.

The second possibility is a magnesium deficiency. So typically, what I have people do first is to take two chelated magnesium capsules at bedtime. Now this is not magnesium citrate, but magnesium glycinate– 150 and 300 milligrams, at night. After two or three days, the cramping should go away. If it doesn’t, then you deal with the tendinitis behind the knee.

More than likely what you’re looking at is one of those two things. The two muscles that go from the knee down to the foot, the flexor digitorum longus and the medial head of the gastrocnemius, they cause the foot pain. But there are two others. One is called the semimembranosus and then the fourth one, the semitendinosus, go from the same place all the way up to hip. So what you’re describing is spot on. Now more than likely the way that you did this was walking up either ramps, ladders, or you jumped into a hole. Okay. Because it’s an extension injury of the knees.

Start with two capsules of Magnesium Glycinate at bed time, but don’t take more than that without asking me.[/testimonial][/testimonials]

David S Klein, MD

David S. Klein, MD, FACA, FACPM was born in Washington, DC, and was raised in Chevy Chase, Maryland. He completed his undergraduate education at the University of Maryland with degrees in Chemistry and Psychology.

Medical School was completed at the University of Maryland at Baltimore, followed by Internship in General Surgery at the University of North Carolina and Residency in Anesthesiology at the Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Dr Klein has been practicing medicine since 1983, concentrating in Pain Medicine, Minimally Invasive Medicine and Surgery, and Neuroendocrinology. Earning Board Certification in Anesthesiology, Dr. Klein was elected Fellow in the American College of Anesthesiology, and he was elected Fellow in the American College of Pain Medicine. He is currently an adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Central Florida, School of Medicine.

He has focused his private practice on treating patients with hormone imbalance issues, nutritional deficiency related medical problems as well as pain related issues and impairment. With a highly-complex, CLIA licensed laboratory in-house, he has been able to provide rapid-turn around analysis efficiently and cost-effectively.
Lecturing extensively nationally as well as internationally, Dr. Klein has authored many articles on topics relating to pain, injury and nutritionally modulated illness. His radio show, “Pain Free Living,” received top ratings during the 6 years it was on the air. Currently practicing in Longwood, Florida, Dr. Klein practices entirely in the office setting.

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