Introduction

The incidence of osteoporosis
increases with age, and is develops at an earlier age in woman than in men. About 55 % of Americans, women more so than
men, are at risk of developing osteoporosis. This disease is characterized by a demineralization of the bones, which
become porous and fragile, this causing a higher susceptibility to fractures.5

Background to Medical Intervention

Bone is largely calcium in
nature, and if demineralization were the issue than common sense would dictate
that increasing dietary intake of calcium would arrest, reverse or at least
minimize the ravages of this illness. For years, physicians recommended
increase in dietary calcium as the principal intervention in this illness.3
It is only now becoming more obvious that calcium intake is but one of many
nutritional concerns that must be addressed in order to effectively treat
ostoporosis. Many factors, including age,
menopausal status, total calcium, vitamin K2 and vitamin D intake,7 as
well as consumption  of cigarettes,
saturated fats, alcohol, and cola proved to be linked to a lower bone mineral
density.

FACT #1: The human adult requires approximately 200 mg
of elemental calcium per day, and if absorption is between 20% and 40%, the
nutritional allowance is approximately 1,000 mg per day. Too much calcium causes more immediate
problems involving muscle and nerve. These regulatory mechanisms modulate the
absorption of calcium. That is, calcium
in excess of 1,200 mg or so will cause the body to reduce the percentage
absorbed. While this would appear to be
‘wasteful’ of an inexpensive nutrient, the real cost is that the excess calcium
competes with absorption of other micronutrients, resulting in poor absorption
of these.

Too much of a
good thing is, in fact, a very bad thing. Calcium ingestion in excess of the requisite  amount reduces rates of absorption of calcium
thereby limiting the calcium burden in the vascular system, but dietary
cations, including calcium compete for
absorption. That is, increasing dietary
calcium past a fairly modest level actually inhibits the absorption of other
cations, including magnesium and strontium, both essential for development and
maintenance of bone.1

FACT #2: Taking a properly balanced
mineral supplement minimizes the danger of ‘overdoing it.’

FACT #3: Most commercially available
vitamin/mineral supplements are worthless because they present the minerals in
a poorly absorbed, inorganic form. This
is done so that the manufacturer can provide a ‘1-tablet solution’ to all of
your needs. It is better that you should keep your money in your pocket than to
purchase this junk.

By | 2015-04-29T17:43:56+00:00 September 21st, 2008|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Osteoporosis Treatment: Nutritional Supplement