Peptide that can induce cancer cell death

From the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine:

Researchers have created a peptide that binds to a protein, converting it from a cancer-promoting protein to a cancer-killing protein.

The Bcl-2 protein has long been known to protect cancer cells from programmed cell death, or apoptosis, a process that the body uses to destroy cancerous cells. Interest in Bcl-2 led Xiao-kun Zhang and colleagues at Burnham Institute for Medical Research to create a peptide called NuBCP-9 from a protein called Nur77, which is a potent pro-apoptotic (cell death-promoting) protein.  Both laboratory and animal studies showed that NuBCP-9 binds to Bcl-2, converting it into a pro-apoptotic protein, which induced cell death in cancer cells.

“Our results provide insight into Bcl-2 conversion and identify a new direction for Bcl-2-based drug leads and cancer drug development,” said Professor Zhang in a news release issued by Burnham Institute for Medical Research.

Kolluri SK, Zhu X, Zhou X, Lin B, Chen Y, Sun K, Tian X, Town J, Cao X, Lin F, Zhai D, Kitada S, Luciano F, O'Donnell E, Cao Y, He F, Lin J, Reed JC, Satterthwait AC, Zhang XK. A short Nur77-derived peptide converts bcl-2 from a protector to a killer. Cancer Cell. 2008;14:285-298.

David S Klein, MD

David S. Klein, MD, FACA, FACPM was born in Washington, DC, and was raised in Chevy Chase, Maryland. He completed his undergraduate education at the University of Maryland with degrees in Chemistry and Psychology.

Medical School was completed at the University of Maryland at Baltimore, followed by Internship in General Surgery at the University of North Carolina and Residency in Anesthesiology at the Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Dr Klein has been practicing medicine since 1983, concentrating in Pain Medicine, Minimally Invasive Medicine and Surgery, and Neuroendocrinology. Earning Board Certification in Anesthesiology, Dr. Klein was elected Fellow in the American College of Anesthesiology, and he was elected Fellow in the American College of Pain Medicine. He is currently an adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Central Florida, School of Medicine.

He has focused his private practice on treating patients with hormone imbalance issues, nutritional deficiency related medical problems as well as pain related issues and impairment. With a highly-complex, CLIA licensed laboratory in-house, he has been able to provide rapid-turn around analysis efficiently and cost-effectively.
Lecturing extensively nationally as well as internationally, Dr. Klein has authored many articles on topics relating to pain, injury and nutritionally modulated illness. His radio show, “Pain Free Living,” received top ratings during the 6 years it was on the air. Currently practicing in Longwood, Florida, Dr. Klein practices entirely in the office setting.

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