Post-Concussion; Trauma Induced Headaches; Migraines

[title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Question[/title][testimonials design=”classic” backgroundcolor=”” textcolor=”” class=”” id=””][testimonial name=”” avatar=”male” image=”” image_border_radius=”” company=”” link=”” target=”_self”]I have 5 documented concussions in the past, and have recently began having migraines. What can I do about it?[/testimonial][/testimonials][separator style_type=”none” top_margin=”” bottom_margin=”20″ sep_color=”” icon=”” width=”” class=”” id=””][title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Answer[/title][testimonials design=”classic” backgroundcolor=”” textcolor=”” class=”” id=””][testimonial name=”” avatar=”male” image=”” image_border_radius=”” company=”” link=”” target=”_self”]A post-concussion headache, can be treated with a particular omega-3 fatty acid called DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid. The dosage is typically between 250 and 500 mg 3 to 5 times a day.

` DHA helps the brain remyelinate. DHA is the most prevalent of all oils present in the brain, and if you’re deficient in DHA, the body is unable to “rewire” itself. The other thing that can happen, and is a little bit trickier to treat, is progesterone imbalance. Your body needs adequate progesterone to heal.

You have a history of concussion. Sometimes that can cause the adrenal glands to malfunction, so cortisol secretion decreases, production of estrogen, testosterone, cortisol, and DHEA, as well as the progesterone levels are not adequate, and you’ll end up with these difficulties.

Additionally, you rule out sphenoid or ethmoid sinusitis, which can be a miserable headache issues. But if your head was bounced around, you can actually cause this type of sinus issue. It’s very difficult to break, but you do need a special CAT scan to see it. If you don’t look for it, you’ll never find it. It’s unusual but it’s possible there.

Post-traumatic hypothyroidism can also cause headaches like this. Check for thyroid issues as well.[/testimonial][/testimonials]

David S Klein, MD

David S. Klein, MD, FACA, FACPM was born in Washington, DC, and was raised in Chevy Chase, Maryland. He completed his undergraduate education at the University of Maryland with degrees in Chemistry and Psychology.

Medical School was completed at the University of Maryland at Baltimore, followed by Internship in General Surgery at the University of North Carolina and Residency in Anesthesiology at the Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Dr Klein has been practicing medicine since 1983, concentrating in Pain Medicine, Minimally Invasive Medicine and Surgery, and Neuroendocrinology. Earning Board Certification in Anesthesiology, Dr. Klein was elected Fellow in the American College of Anesthesiology, and he was elected Fellow in the American College of Pain Medicine. He is currently an adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Central Florida, School of Medicine.

He has focused his private practice on treating patients with hormone imbalance issues, nutritional deficiency related medical problems as well as pain related issues and impairment. With a highly-complex, CLIA licensed laboratory in-house, he has been able to provide rapid-turn around analysis efficiently and cost-effectively.
Lecturing extensively nationally as well as internationally, Dr. Klein has authored many articles on topics relating to pain, injury and nutritionally modulated illness. His radio show, “Pain Free Living,” received top ratings during the 6 years it was on the air. Currently practicing in Longwood, Florida, Dr. Klein practices entirely in the office setting.

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